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Equine Diet & Brain Topics at Duchy Conference

Published: February 8, 2017

Duchy College Duchy Stoke Climsland University

The second Higher Education (HE) Animal & Equine Science Conference was held at Duchy College, Stoke Climsland for all Cornwall College HE students.

 

The first lecture was by Dr Catherine Hale who presented her recent work on the effects of diet on the horse. Catherine also discussed her work that involved a series of in vitro experiments looking at digestive capabilities of horses prone to dietary-induced laminitis. The presentation also touched on her extensive in vivo work, examining the potential of novel forage (red clover) to improve overall starch digestibility.

 

After a lunch break, delegates were treated to another excellent lecture by Dr Andrew Hemmings from the Royal Agricultural University, Cirencester, on his recent research into the structure of the equine brain, its links to stereotypical behaviour and how probing of brain function can be used for behavioural analysis. Blink recognition was also discussed as a non- invasive clinician diagnostic tool followed by an extensive question and a question and answer session.

 

Student, Lucinda Grimshaw on the Equine Training and Behaviour foundation degree course, said: “It has been a great day, I thought the guest speakers were fab and really appreciated their delivery style. I was a little concerned that I’d leave feeling bamboozled, but they explained their subjects extremely well.”

 

To complete the day, Michelle Chappell, HE Course Manager, invited students to join her in the lab for an equine and calf brain dissection demonstration. Students that were willing also had the opportunity to dissect a brain.  Their task was to locate the Nucleus Caudatus, Claustrum and Putamen so they could establish the site for the Internal Capsule Corpus Striatum, commonly termed as the pleasure centre for the animal, linking back to behavioural traits discussed by Dr Hemmings.erine also discussed her work that involved a series of in vitro experiments looking at digestive capabilities of horses prone to dietary-induced laminitis. The presentation also touched on her extensive in vivo work, examining the potential of novel forage (red clover) to improve overall starch digestibility

 

Course Manager, Alison Abbey, said: “It was an absolute treat and fantastic opportunity for all the conference attendees to receive such excellent lectures from international speakers and experts within their field of study. All of the students and staff who attended appreciated the expertise and passion of the guest speakers and look forward to the next conference.”

erine also discussed her work that involved a series of in vitro experiments looking at digestive capabilities of horses prone to dietary-induced laminitis. The presentation also touched on her extensive in vivo work, examining the potential of novel forage (red clover) to improve overall starch digestibility.

For more information on the range of Higher Education courses available across The Cornwall College Group visit www.duchy.ac.uk or call 0845 60 50 455.

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